Book Bites

Musings and tidbits about the book world.

“By modern standards, the Black Panther is not a flawless example of a black superhero. In their first draft of the character, Lee and Kirby called him “the Coal Tiger” and gave him a goofy yellow and black costume. Even in his final form, his superhero alias includes the word “Black.” This is true of many early African and African American superheroes, as if what makes them remarkable is neither their superpowers nor their heroism, but their ethnicity. Most problematic, though, was that Marvel made their most prominent black superhero the star of a series called Jungle Action.

All of these flaws were lost on Dwayne McDuffie when he first encountered the Black Panther in 1973, at the age of 11. What struck him was the character’s commanding sense of dignity. The Black Panther wasn’t anyone’s sidekick. He wasn’t an angry thug. He wasn’t a victim. He was his own hero, his own man. As Dwayne describes it, “In the space of 15 pages, black people moved from invisible to inevitable.”

Dwayne’s love of the Black Panther eventually blossomed into a love of comics in general. Dwayne was a smart guy with a lot of options in life. He’d earned a master’s degree in physics. But he chose to write comics as his career. I would argue that without the Black Panther, this flawed black character created by a writer and an artist who were not black, there would be no Dwayne McDuffie the comic book writer.”

Weekend reading! #summerreading #caribbeandiaspora #debut #tiphanieyanique #diverselit #weneeddiversebooks #books

Summer Reading Series

tubooks:

The whole #WeNeedDiverseBooks summer reading series on one page! How many have you read?

Nice!

(via stacylwhitman)

fashion-by-the-book:

If I Stay Duo by Gayle Forman

My new fav. Lit Tumblr!

fashion-by-the-book:

If I Stay Duo by Gayle Forman

My new fav. Lit Tumblr!

schoollibraryjournal:

Seven-year-old library fundraisers, Josephine Sinclair and Sarai Williams.
Two Second Graders Pitch to Restore School Library on Indiegogo | School Library Journal 

schoollibraryjournal:

Seven-year-old library fundraisers, Josephine Sinclair and Sarai Williams.

Two Second Graders Pitch to Restore School Library on Indiegogo | School Library Journal 

weneeddiversebooks:

#WeNeedDiverseBooks summer reading series SPECIAL with the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center’s BookDragon!
If you liked the Twilight series, try The Hunt by Andrew Fukuda because both series feature undead love triangles caught up in heart-stopping chills and thrills… and vampires. Did we mention lots of vampires?! BookDragon review here.

weneeddiversebooks:

#WeNeedDiverseBooks summer reading series SPECIAL with the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center’s BookDragon!

If you liked the Twilight series, try The Hunt by Andrew Fukuda because both series feature undead love triangles caught up in heart-stopping chills and thrills… and vampires. Did we mention lots of vampires?! BookDragon review here.

(via richincolor)

“What has been happening in Ferguson, Missouri for the past few weeks has been absolutely enraging and heartbreaking on so many levels. I don’t want to say it is shocking or unbelievable or HOW COULD THIS HAPPEN IN AMERICA because while what has been happening in Ferguson might seem “un-American” to me, it’s the America that so many people exist in. And that’s part of the warranted rage and heartbreak. While following the news about Ferguson on Twitter (by far the best place to get news on issues like this) I saw the hashtag #kidlit4justice” start. The idea was to round up book suggestions about It was created and promoted by three of my favorite people on Twitter: Sarah Hamburg, Kids Like Us, and Ebony Thomas. (Dr. Thomas also writes the amazing blog The Dark Fantastic, which should be on your must read list.) Lots of people chimed in with great suggestions.”

I think I might have to go back to PEI soon. (via Searching for ‘Anne of Green Gables’ on Prince Edward Island - NYTimes.com)

“To lump us all together as multicultural because we’re not white puts too much focus on race and culture and not enough on power.”

—   Diversity in Children’s Books: It’s a Question of Power http://t.co/QbjB1hf4Rq by Mitali Perkins (via kishizuka)

“Here in Southern California, Latinas are doctors, lawyers, teachers, principals, chiropractors. Name a profession, we’re covered. Is this media invisibility because we’re “new” to this country? Er, many of our ancestors were here before statehood. A friend and I were driving down a street where a building had just been demolished. “What used to be there?” he asked. It was impossible to conjure up. It struck me that that is what my existence is like, and that of my mother, my sister and my daughter. Invisibility in the media makes it impossible for others to conjure up what we could possibly be doing with our lives, what we could possibly look like. And if we are doing something “unexpected” it is because there is something “exceptional” about us. This is not some strange multigenerational coincidence, this whitewashing of who we and others are is the history of our country. The head of ABC, Paul Lee, recently came out as being very much in favor of diversifying its lineup. “America doesn’t look like that anymore,” he said, meaning it is no longer all-white. America has never been all white. Yes, indeed, at times I am an angry woman of color. Ethnicity is just one facet of who we are, one piece of the complexity of being human. In The Amado Women I wanted to explore the challenging and emotionally fraught lives of one family. I hope to broaden the mental landscape of people who think that all of our stories are of immigration. I write to shred the cloak of invisibility thrust upon us. Or, as the French director Robert Bresson says, “To make visible that without you will never be seen.””