Book Bites

Musings and tidbits about the book world.

My friend @chelseyphilpot ‘s book #EveninParadise is a @publishersweekly book of the week! Out on 10/14

This reality is a bit harder to swallow: There are more white people in the US and Canada because the US and Canada were established using the systematic genocide of Native peoples, the theft of Native lands, and the labour of enslaved peoples in the past and immigrant peoples currently who were and are never meant to stay or survive.

And now you’re uncomfortable. Good.

When you accept and acknowledge that census figures reflect a long history of marginalization, it is preposterous to use these same figures as the benchmark to which you measure the inclusion of marginalized people.

—   There’s a great piece in the Toast about representation and diversity (‘Proportional Representation’ Has No Place In Diversity Discussions by Léonicka Valcius) today. (via whineandbeer)

(via audreymgonzalez)

“In the world at large—I don’t know if it’s a side effect of staring at flat screens the whole day—adults and kids have become more and more literal-minded and less capable of grasping analogy and symbolism. Fairy tales promise us from the very start that they’re not the real world. “Once upon a time” right away releases us. I think the more Google-fied we become, the more we believe that there’s a factual interpretation for everything, and the more we rely on our skepticism and become immune to fairy tales, poetry, and dreaming. We need them more now than we did 40 years ago. It has become harder for us to live in comfort with analogy and suggestion. We want concreteness and absolutism. And fairy tales do not promise absolutes. That’s why they’re essential nutrition. One of the things that Egg & Spoon emphasizes is that the world is magical. As literal and concrete I am as a father, in my heart I am a child, and I believe that the world is still magic.”

—   I got to chat with GREGORY MAGUIRE and he said such profound things. Interview: Gregory Maguire on Why the World Needs Magic and ‘Egg and Spoon’ | School Library Journal

“Something I have intuited (or outright heard) from some publishers, large and small, is that they think of reviews as part of their promotion efforts. This makes sense from their point of view, in that they use reviews for marketing purposes. But we don’t work for the publishers, we work for our readers. Smart publishers know that this is in their best interest.”

—   Roger Tells it Like it isThe buck stops over there - The Horn Book

“Boyd’s work was cut out for her at Phillips, but she took a nuanced approach. “I didn’t start off with what I thought they should be reading,” she says. “I listened to them.” Her teens most enjoyed reading manga, poetry, vampire stories, and street lit. Boyd bases her purchasing decisions on their preferences, working with an average annual budget of about $5,000. In addition to incorporating manga titles such as the “Bleach” and “One Piece” series (both Shueisha) and paranormal romances, she stocks her collection with titles targeted to hi-lo readers, including “Bluford High” (Townsend) and street lit such as Treasure Blue’s Fly Betty (Cash Money Content, 2013) and Sister Souljah’s The Coldest Winter Ever (Pocket Books, 1999). Though many educators shy away from incorporating street lit into their collections, Boyd has been a big proponent of the genre and believes that it “[serves] as a teaching tool.” Karen Edmonson, a middle school science teacher who worked with Boyd at Chicago’s Ninos Heroes School, where Boyd was librarian from 2004 to 2007, witnessed the librarian’s ability to turn middle school students on to pleasure reading.”

—   Wonderful story by @dibblyfresh about an amazing librarian. Chicago Hope: High School Librarian K.C. Boyd | School Library Journal
maudnewton:

First two sentences of Rebecca Solnit’s latest*: “The story of Cassandra, the woman who told the truth but was not believed, is not nearly as embedded in our culture as that of the Boy Who Cried Wolf—that is, the boy who was believed the first few times he told the same lie. Perhaps it should be.”
* From the October Harpers, in my mailbox today but not yet on newsstands.


Oh snap.

maudnewton:

First two sentences of Rebecca Solnit’s latest*: “The story of Cassandra, the woman who told the truth but was not believed, is not nearly as embedded in our culture as that of the Boy Who Cried Wolf—that is, the boy who was believed the first few times he told the same lie. Perhaps it should be.”

* From the October Harpers, in my mailbox today but not yet on newsstands.

Oh snap.

(via thepermeableboundary)

teenvogue:

Our fall reading list looks a lot like this…
Because homework can wait » 


Awesome list!

teenvogue:

Our fall reading list looks a lot like this…

Because homework can wait » 

Awesome list!

(via knitewriter)

Nice #latinolit haul this weekend! #lcwc #weneeddiversebooks
Yes, THAT Jane Goodall! She signed a copy of her new book: the Chimpanzee Children of Gombe. #lovemyjob
A must-read for anyone who works, writes, loves teens. (via The teens on Tumblr are all right)