Book Bites

Musings and tidbits about the book world.

“To lump us all together as multicultural because we’re not white puts too much focus on race and culture and not enough on power.”

—   Diversity in Children’s Books: It’s a Question of Power http://t.co/QbjB1hf4Rq by Mitali Perkins (via kishizuka)

“Here in Southern California, Latinas are doctors, lawyers, teachers, principals, chiropractors. Name a profession, we’re covered. Is this media invisibility because we’re “new” to this country? Er, many of our ancestors were here before statehood. A friend and I were driving down a street where a building had just been demolished. “What used to be there?” he asked. It was impossible to conjure up. It struck me that that is what my existence is like, and that of my mother, my sister and my daughter. Invisibility in the media makes it impossible for others to conjure up what we could possibly be doing with our lives, what we could possibly look like. And if we are doing something “unexpected” it is because there is something “exceptional” about us. This is not some strange multigenerational coincidence, this whitewashing of who we and others are is the history of our country. The head of ABC, Paul Lee, recently came out as being very much in favor of diversifying its lineup. “America doesn’t look like that anymore,” he said, meaning it is no longer all-white. America has never been all white. Yes, indeed, at times I am an angry woman of color. Ethnicity is just one facet of who we are, one piece of the complexity of being human. In The Amado Women I wanted to explore the challenging and emotionally fraught lives of one family. I hope to broaden the mental landscape of people who think that all of our stories are of immigration. I write to shred the cloak of invisibility thrust upon us. Or, as the French director Robert Bresson says, “To make visible that without you will never be seen.””

schoollibraryjournal:

Fangirl has inspired its own fanworks, something that @RainbowRowell embraces.
Fan Fiction Takes Flight Among Teens | School Library Journal 

schoollibraryjournal:

Fangirl has inspired its own fanworks, something that @RainbowRowell embraces.

Fan Fiction Takes Flight Among Teens | School Library Journal 

cbcdiversity:

The Dear Book Publishers series is a showcase of letters written by 5th graders from Dothan Brook School. These students were tasked with looking at the diversity in their school library’s picture book collection along with the race of children featured on Kindergarten Second Step cards. Reacting to what they had learned, the students wrote letters to book publishers, the Vermont Agency of Education, the school principal, and the district superintendent. During the month of August, CBC Diversity will showcase all of the letters created by the Dothan Brook School’s 5th grade class.

cbcdiversity:

The Dear Book Publishers series is a showcase of letters written by 5th graders from Dothan Brook School. These students were tasked with looking at the diversity in their school library’s picture book collection along with the race of children featured on Kindergarten Second Step cards. Reacting to what they had learned, the students wrote letters to book publishers, the Vermont Agency of Education, the school principal, and the district superintendent. During the month of August, CBC Diversity will showcase all of the letters created by the Dothan Brook School’s 5th grade class.

“The study, which will be published in a forthcoming issue of the Journal of Applied Social Psychology, concludes by noting that the Harry Potter novels may be especially effective at increasing the tolerance of their readers precisely because they concern themselves with made-up categories like Muggles and Mudbloods. More overt attempts to change readers’ views about real-life groups, Mr. Vezzali and his co-authors note, could prompt defensive or resistant reactions. By identifying with the fictional character of Harry Potter, and by drawing connections, conscious or not, between his treatment of people different from him and their own attitudes toward stigmatized groups, readers of these novels work their own kind of wizardry: the magic of the literary imagination.”

libkimberly:

snarkyl1brar1an:

Wear what you read, literary inspired cuffs by Accessoreads.

1. Library catalog, 2. Edgar Allan Poe, 3. Louisa May Alcott’s quote from Little Women, 4. Once Upon a Time, 5. Jane Austen’s quote from Northanger Abbey, 6. Cirero’s quote, 7. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s quote from his poem Morituri Salutamus, 8. William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, 9. St. Augustine’s quote. 10. Antique books.

These are AMAZING!

Yet another thing I need immediately. WTF Tumblr, stop doing this to me.

Pretty!!! Excuse me while I wipe up my drool.

(Source: bookporn, via lib-tech-in-the-tardis)

crhodey:

geekmelange:

sir-sherlock-of-the-tardis:

kismesister:

friendlytroll:

mamasam:

stopthatimp:

nani was NINETEEN and such a fucking badass who was so protective of lilo and just ROLLED with aliens being a thing towards the end of the movie. #1 Disney relative of all time.

I have honestly been waiting AGES for the right gifset to express the wonderful perfection that is Nani. She is not only protective of Lilo, she respects the way Lilo’s imagination and quirkiness works.

Pudge the fish got a peanut butter sandwich every Thursday. Nani does not argue the logic of feeding him, only suggests an alternative sandwich when they are out of peanut butter. Lilo was allowed to take as many photos of whatever mundane or odd subjects as she wanted and Nani would get them developed. Nani recognized what were important habits for Lilo.

When Lilo asks for a pet lobster, Nani does not tell her that lobsters are not pets. She tells her, “We don’t have a lobster door, we have a dog door.” She makes sure the woman at the pound does not tell Lilo that “Stitch is not a real name”.

NANI SPENDS THE ENTIRE MOVIE MAKING SURE THAT LILO NEVER FEELS LIKE HER IDEAS ARE WRONG.

The only time we truly see Nani get angry with Lilo is when she is scared of Lilo being taken away. Nani spends the entire movie stressed out over taking care of her sister, trying to find a job, trying to make sure her sister has a friend, and yet she is always willing to put that extra effort, over and over again, to make sure that Lilo always believes that anything is possible.

This is a great moment because she probably *remembered* that Lilo said this once. And you know what? Shes not ending this day by letting her little sister think this is her fault. She’s not having an easy time trying to be a parent, but she knows none of this is her sisters fault, and shes not going to let her think it is. 

And half of her terror of losing Lilo isnt even just losing her family; its knowing that wherever Lilo goes, they won’t know how to do these things. They won’t understand her. 

What a good movie. 

Casual reminder that the reason Lilo obsessively feeds the fish is because her parents died in a rainstorm and she firmly believes Pudge controls the weather. If you pay attention to the feeding sequence you will notice that storm clouds recede and dissipate, a visual narrative that confirms this.

It’s not just a habit. It’s a very real part of Lilo’s healing process and Nani understands that.

Also if you pay attention to Nani’s room you’ll notice she had surfing posters and trophies. She was very much on her way to being a pro surfer but had to give it up to become the adult Lilo needed her to be.

And not ONCE does Nani show her sister any resentment. It’s worth it to keep her family together. This is a young woman who is willing to sacrifice all of her dreams and make incredibly grown up decisions.

What I am saying is Nani is the best disney princess of all time. Disney Queen even.

Always reblog nani

Nani & LIlo - doing the awesome “sisters-focused narrative” before Frozen was a thing and getting less than 1/2 the credit.

Aaaanndd this is why it’s my favorite Disney movie (though not my favorite princess because to call either Lilo or Nani a “princess” would be to diminish what they ahve to offer).

Awesome sisters.

(via catscardigansbooks)

sixpenceee:

Famous Failures

I stumbled upon this video a long time ago and it honestly made me feel a lot better.

"If you’ve never failed, you’ve never lived."

I could not fit everyone mentioned in the video in this post so be sure to give the video a look.

WATCH IT HERE

Dreamers fail, but don’t let it stop them from dreaming.

(via lib-tech-in-the-tardis)

npr:

"Beyond Braille: 3-D Printed Books For The Blind" via Vignesh Ramachandran
With the help of 3D printing, your favorite picture books could become tactile –– and that could make a big difference for blind readers.
– Alexander
Image: University of Colorado Boulder

npr:

"Beyond Braille: 3-D Printed Books For The Blind" via Vignesh Ramachandran

With the help of 3D printing, your favorite picture books could become tactile –– and that could make a big difference for blind readers.

– Alexander

Image: University of Colorado Boulder

(via pbsarts)

If only all book covers were created this beautifully! (via 20 Most Beautiful YA Book Covers – Flavorwire)